Category Archives: LUH

Visibility bias in news reporting about Brexit – New publication in Political Research Exchange

A new article co-authored with Christoph Hönnige, Dominic Nyhuis, Philipp Meyer and Susumu Shikano has been published in Political Research Exchange. In it, we in investigate the visibility of British MPs in newspaper reporting on Brexit between July 2017 and March 2019. You can find the abstract below:

Dominating the debate: visibility bias and mentions of British MPs in newspaper reporting on Brexit

Brexit has been the most important issue in British politics in recent years. Whereas extra-parliamentary actors dominated the run-up to the 2016 referendum, the issue moved back to Parliament after the vote. This paper analyses newspaper reporting on Brexit in major British outlets during the post-referendum phase from July 2017 to March 2019. We study the visibility of Members of Parliament to assess whether the debate was balanced between parties and individual MPs relative to their vote and seat share. We conduct an automated text analysis of 58,247 online and offline newspaper articles covering the ideological spectrum from left to right, and from pro-Brexit to anti-Brexit. Our main findings are: (1) Conservative politicians dominated the debate, and (2) organized pro-Brexit MP pressure groups such as ‘Leave Means Leave’ were disproportionally more visible. This means that reporting was biased towards Conservative MPs and within the Conservative Party towards supporters of a hard Brexit. These findings are remarkably stable across different types of newspapers. The results challenge previous analyses that found a higher degree of balance in reporting but corroborate recent studies on the tonality of Brexit reporting that found a pro-Brexit bias.

You can read the full article here (open access): https://doi.org/10.1080/2474736X.2020.1788955

Politics Society Teaching Prize for “Best Lecture” 2019

Last week, I received the teaching prize for “Best Lecture 2019” for my “Introduction to Comparative Politics” lecture. The prize is awarded annually by the Politics Society at the Political Science Department of Leibniz University Hannover in the categories “Best Seminar” and “Best Lecture”. I am very grateful for the award (especially given that my lecture took place Fridays at 8am…) and look forward to ‘defending’ it next year.